Monday, October 26, 2009

Dellinia suffruticosa - Simpoh air

The afternoon was extremely hot with the sun beating down on us as if punishing those who dared venture out in the open. Undeterred, I donned my broad-brimmed straw hat, pat on ample sunblock on my face and arms and went outdoors anyway. Walking along the largely unsheltered Henderson Waves bridge with the traffic below was not exactly a nice day on the beach but it was great to have the greenery shared by so few people for a change. The tall trees around were unfazed by the weather and the variety in such a small area was astounding. For the first time, I actually paid attention to them - African Tulip trees, Rain trees, palms, tembusu trees, bamboo, Pulai trees because no flowers were within sight till I reached the other end of the bridge and saw this clump of Dillenia Suffruticosa shrubs.

Meet the beautiful ladies basking in the sun:

Anna and Mildred.

Felicia and Abigail

Martha and Elsie.

Jenny and Angeline.

Octovia and an interesting shadow cast by a flower or perhaps these monkeys.



2 comments:

walter said...

Hi, I am a frequent visitor to your blog recently. Each time I view a bit (there is so much) of the wonder of nature you have captured with your camera. Yes, the marvel of the zoom and macro to draw attention to what we normally might not notice. I have recently in retirement also taken up photography as a hobby (just an old digital compact which goes auto in almost everything). Perhaps allow me to share with you the pics of flowers which I see during my cycling trips. Simple shots, yet I am quite proud of them!http://flowerssingapore.blogspot.com/(Our blog urls even look similar!)
Best wishes..

Mable said...

Hi Walter,
Thank you for visiting my blog often and sharing your blog with me. Thank God for the flowers and technology for the range of cameras we can choose from to suit our needs. Your flower photos, like mine are captures of your joyful encounters with nature. Retirement is a wonderful time to pursue new hobbies. Have fun!

Cheers,

Mable